Tag Archives: Prison

New Virginia Warden Represses, Revolutionaries Fight Smart

Moorbey’z Blog

This is a Reblog from the above blog site. Here is the link to the original article there (E): http://moorbey.wordpress.com/2013/06/03/new-virginia-warden-represses-revolutionaries-fight-smart/

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by a Virginia prisoner     June 2013     permalink
This missive is about the prison conditions at Sussex I in Virginia. John David is now the warden of Sussex I state prison. His first day on the job he made his grand opening by placing the whole institution on lockdown for 30 days with no justification. Those 30 days revealed his intentions about what to expect form his gestapo-style treatment. For instance, when we are walking in lines to and fro, if anyone does not walk in a straight line, even if it’s one individual out of 40, his rule is that we get no outside recreation and instead get just 1 hour of in-pod rec. During the 30-day lockdown we got no outside recreation whatsoever and no one was able to use the phones on the whole compound. David put us on modified lockdown, just because individuals throughout the compound started complaining to their families and writing grievances, so he had to save face.David has also put peremptory restrictions on some of the political literature that comes through the mailroom. I was hit with censorship of your mailing sent April 26, 2013 [study group discussion]. I did receive all mail prior to that letter. I’m currently appealing the decision: they deemed it “unauthorized.” It’s just repayment, censoring my ability to think outside this cell, trying to control our thoughts and preventing a lot of comrades from learning anything besides the state perspective. The oppressor will never stop oppressing.

These are the basic examples that were studied in the study group assignment 3 “On Contradiction.” “What is the principal aspect of a contradiction?” How does the interdependence (identity) of these contradictory aspects in prison life and the struggle between these aspects determine things in prison life and push their development forward? This only reveals the true political agenda behind super-maxes as being to repress revolutionary thought, not only in the prisons but even in society at large. The resulting division of staff versus prisoners along racial and cultural lines creates an obvious recipe for conflict and abuse, duplicating the conditions of chattel slavery in pre-civil war Amerikkka where poor whites were armed and empowered to have free reign over unarmed and disenfranchised Black slaves on the plantations.

These control unit prisons were designed to effectively isolate, control, and punish prisoners reacting against abuse. In turn they provoke responses, so prison officials can effectively use these events to demonize us as “violent animals” thus playing up self-fulfilling prophecies and stereotypes to justify the construction of more of these super max prisons. This was the main motivation that brought the Attica rebellion in 1971.

Just two weeks ago a guard was severely stabbed over a confrontation that started over a prisoner who did not have enough time to finish his food tray when the guard took his tray. It’s only a fruitless back and forth cycle played out between poor people who’ve been divided along color and cultural lines. In the past I felt myself and my peers to be powerless, therefore fighting with the pigs and treating them with open contempt was in a sense therapeutic. Even now when I witness abuse by the pigs my inner rage boils over, but I have learned to check myself and stand as a witness to testify against these outrages.

This is not to say that we ought to be pacifists. Even a mouse will fight you when cornered. Individual pigs are of no more value to the system then the cost of training their replacements and they can be replaced from the unemployment lines tomorrow. The system will gladly sacrifice any number of them for the opportunity to throw the book at us and paint us as “animals” and “terrorists.” Simply filing paperwork and relying on the courts is also a dead end. But it is useful to create a paper trail and document patterns of abuse. From my time and experience in these control unit conditions it allows one to see the bigger picture.

The prison system institutionalizes isolation and secrecy. The prison walls are designed not only to keep the prisoners in, but to keep the public out preventing observation or knowledge of what is going on inside. Confronting this crazy system, we need to be the voice of reason that raises consciousness and empowers awareness inside and out. In challenging a system built on cruelty and the exercise of absolute and hidden power against the disempowered there will be attempts to provoke us and bait us to incite reactionary violence from us or against us but we must stick to our strategy and not get pulled into theirs.

Indeed as I write this, the warden of this control unit where I am confined is waging a struggle to use metaphysical tactics to demonize us. But their efforts to distort the external contradictions will only lead to greater exposure of the internal contradiction, the truth, which will build our struggle. We must stop acting foolish like bulls. The bullfighter waves his cape and the bull charges and eventually runs into the bullfighter’s sword. But a smart bull wouldn’t do that. He’d wait for the bullfighter to charge him and face his horns. Over the years I have witnessed too many good comrades and potential ones being wasted. We must organize to win! The end game will never change, we must emancipate ourselves, remove the blinds and foment our minds.


Living the Lockdown Life

I trust people will take to heart what Thomas Knapp is implying here! (E)

Center for a Stateless Society

building public awareness of left-wing market anarchism

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Posted by  on Apr 16, 2013 in Commentary

While watching coverage of the Boston Marathon bombing and its aftermath, I couldn’t help but notice multiple uses and variations of the word “lockdown” (e.g. “Boston is locked down”). Nor could I help thinking that I’ve been hearing that word used more and more frequently over the last few years, and finding its  connotations are troubling.

Internet etymological sources inform me that the word “lockdown” emerged in the 1940s to describe mechanical processes such as shutting down machines in an ultra-safe manner for maintenance (by the time I worked in factories, the term was “lockout,”). Its most well-known usage, however, dates from the early 1970s. Until the last decade or so it was nearly unique to “correctional institutions.”

A prison lockdown occurs in the context of a riot or other exceptional disciplinary situation: All inmates are ordered to their cells (as opposed to the cafeteria, the exercise yard or, in prisons which operate slave labor schemes, their work stations). The facility is temporarily closed to visitors, deliveries, etc. — only “essential personnel” may enter, leave, or move within the grounds.

A useful term to describe a common, or at least standardized, process. But in the early 1990s, the term vaulted over the prison wall and into more general usage. Google’s Ngram service, which traces the frequency of words in books, graphs slow, steady increase in the term’s appearance until 1990, followed by a  ”hockey stick”: Between 1990 and 2008, use of the term “lockdown” in English-language books ballooned to ten times that 1990 baseline.

Suddenly lockdowns were no longer just a prison thing. They became a school thing, and then an area, neighborhood, city thing.

As of Tuesday morning, April 16, 2013, Google News reported more than 50,000 uses of the word “lockdown” in the news media in the previous 30 days.

“Salem [Massachusetts] schools hold lockdown drills.”  “[Dallas, Texas] elementary to dismiss at normal time after lock down” (for nearly five hours because of a single shooting nearby, but not on campus). “Fallston [Maryland] High, Middle schools briefly placed on lockdown” (because a “suspicious person” was reported nearby). Lockdowns at hospitals. Lockdowns at military bases. Neighborhoods locked down for politicians’ social calls and cities locked down for politicians’ funerals.

Ironic? Portentous? Certainly not mere coincidence. The term is becoming so common because it works. It’s descriptive. Not just of the process, but of the societies in which the process is applied.

America in particular and western societies in general have, over the same decades producing that increased usage, degenerated into open air prisons. The inmates — us — although under nearly ubiquitous surveillance, are mostly left free to wander around (not all of them; last time I checked, one of every 32 Americans was “in the correctional system” — imprisoned or on parole, probation or house arrest), as long as we can produce paperwork on demand and “explain ourselves” to the guards if interrogated. And, of course, until the guards pick one of fifty bazillion reasons to “lock down” the block we happen to be on.

That’s not freedom. It’s highly conditional sufferance. And until we reject the lockdown life and abolish the states which impose it, things are going to get more and more conditional and less and less tolerable.

Citations to this article:


“Systemic Failures Persist” in California Prison Mental Health Care, Judge Rules

The way we treat individuals in prison is atrocious as it is. This is inexcusable and supposedly even with a very minor amount of improvement over the past 20 years or so. And even that tiny amount had to be FORCED upon the state by the federal courts! Things need to change folks or one day when you are the one sitting in prison you’ll wish they had.
If you don’t think that is possible you’d better remember that the feds add an extra 1000 or more new laws to the Federal Register each and every year. That doesn’t even include your state and local yocals. So…You and I are all guilty of some crime. They just haven’t chosen to enforce the one we are guilty of yet. They will. (E)

Oh and one more thing-ya better learn to get along with ALL kinds of people no matter how much you disagree with them. Find some common ground. I’ve recently learned I have a lot more in common with former Black Panthers than some christians.


United States leads the world in the number of prisoners and in the percentage of the population in prison.

FROM:  http://newworldorderreport.com

Note from New World Order Report:

I edited and updated this article from the Economic Collapse Blog with some of my own info to add to it, I felt it was too light…

By Jonathan Elinoff of New World Order ReportEconomic Collapse Blog

Please feel free to click on any link that is underlined in this article to learn more about the information that sentence is referring to.  Many people contact our Website asking us to show our sources, just click on the underlined part of a sentence, that is a link to the source.

Doesn’t it seem like almost everything is becoming a crime in America now?  Americans are being arrested and charged with crimes for doing things like leaving dog poop on the ground, opening up Christmas presents early, not recycling properly, farting in class and having brown lawns.  But is it healthy for our society for the police to be involved in such silly things?  Every single day the United States inches closer to becoming a totalitarian society.

One of the hallmarks of an authoritarian government is its fixation on hiding everything it does behind a wall of secrecy while simultaneously monitoring, invading and collecting files on everything its citizenry does.  This, America faces today, which it has never faced in its history.

While there are some that would welcome this shift, the truth is that throughout history the societies that have experienced the greatest economic prosperity have all had at least a certain level of freedom.  Business thrives when people feel free to live and work.  When a government tightens the grip too much, many people just start shutting down.  As we continue to criminalize relatively normal behavior our slide toward becoming a totalitarian state will only accelerate.

Today, the United States leads the world in the number of prisoners and in the percentage of the population in prison.  The United States has 5% of the world’s population, but approximately 25% of the world’s incarcerated population.  Click on the image below to see a larger version.

According to the U.S. Bureau of Justice Statistics, as of the end of 2009 a total of 7,225,800 people were either on probation, in prison or on parole in America.

That is a sign of a very, very sick society.  Either we have a massive crime problem or the “control grid” that our leaders have erected for us is wildly out of control.

Or both.

Many people believe this is just because the society we live in is criminalizing normal behavior and this would in turn create an expanding “prison industrial complex” where prisons (which are privatized, for-profit industries with shareholders who build and invest in them) make money.  Believe it or not, most prisons and detention facilities are privately owned, not government owned.  This means that they get money (Lots of $$) from the city, state or federal government from taxes collected by citizens to pay for the costs of the facility, at a profit.  You heard me right, many prisons get money (Lots of $$) for every person they put in their prison and the shareholders and owners of the prisons make money on that.

Many of the arguments you hear about to support the continuation and expansion of this “prison industrial complex” are usually something like, “well the prison provides jobs for people and keeps the economy growing.”  See, when they build one of these huge prisons to eventually overcrowd (since they know normal behavior is being criminalized) they need to build roads to get to the prison, housing districts to house the workers, power plants to supply power, police stations, shopping centers, etc.  A prison creates a mini-society that will eventually grow.  It puts all the people in the prison it doesn’t like in society (like thinkers, rebels, artists, undesirables, people who don’t follow orders or assimilate) and when those people are in prison, the rest of society functions fine, without anyone causing a problem or trying to demand rights or demand oversight or demand equality or the like.  Prisons create the perfect, mindless zombie society for the 1984 type or Brave New World type of future that some people in power want.  When people get out of prison, they can’t get jobs and try to adapt back to a normal life, because no one hires criminals.  They have to go on parole and pay money to the state even AFTER they served time and then deal with psychologists and UA’s and all kinds of uphill battles.  Most people get out of jail and go back to environments that allow for them to continue their self-abuse (which most crimes, especially drug offenses) lifestyle.  Drug offenders who are addicted to serious drugs might need a doctor, but should we be destroying their lives forever by putting them in prison?

Now does it look so weird when you see overcrowded prisons and perhaps your city passing laws that make no sense?  Our society is criminalizing normal behavior, people.  This is something much of the South started after the civil war.  Instead of slavery, Southern states outlawed marijuana use, knowing that much of the use was culturally bias towards non-whites.  This in turn allowed them to build the first big prisons and detain people against their will for “breaking the law” and then forcing them to work.  Thats right, prisons force people to work.  Cleaning roads, building license plates, you name it.  Even farming.  In the South, the prisons that force inmates to work are allowed to sell their services or products at a profit on top of the money they make maintaining their prisons, at a profit, which they collect from taxpayers.  Sound crazy?  Take a look at what they pay some of these inmates.  In some cases its $.02 cents an hour.  No joke.

In one case, a judge was sending children to juvenile detention so much the facility overloaded with inmates.  Turned out, the judge was a shareholder in the detention facility.  This means that legally, the judge had a “conflict of interest” in all cases he oversaw seeing as how his income was affected by the decisions he made as judge.  The more people he put away, the more money he made.  Sound criminal?  It is.  But our society is so apathetic to corruption these days that nothing is being done.

But how in the world are we supposed to have a healthy economy if our entire nation is being turned into one gigantic prison?

Sadly, it is not just hardcore criminals that are being rounded up and abused by authorities these days.  The following are 14 of the most ridiculous things that Americans are being arrested for….

#1 A Michigan man has been charged with a felony and could face up to 5 years in prison for reading his wife’s email.

#2 A 49-year-old Queens woman had bruises all over her body after she was handcuffed, arrested and brutally beaten by NYPD officers.  So what was her offense?  The officers thought that her little dog had left some poop that she didn’t clean up.

#3 A 56-year-old woman who was once a rape victim refused to let airport security officials feel her breasts so she was thrown to the floor, put in handcuffs and arrested.

#4 In Milwaukee, one man was recently fined $500 for swearing on a public bus.

#5 Several years ago a 12-year-old boy in South Carolina was actually arrested by police for opening up a Christmas present early against his family’s wishes.

#6 In some areas of the country, it is now a crime to not recycle properly.  For example, the city of Cleveland has announced plans to sort through trash cans to ensure that people are actually recycling according to city guidelines.

#7 A 12-year-old girl from Queens was arrested earlier this year and taken out of her school in handcuffs for writing “Lex was here. 2/1/10″ and “I love my friends Abby and Faith” on her desk.

#8 Back in 2008, a 13-year-old boy in Florida was actually arrested by police for farting in class.

#9 The feds recently raided an Amish farmer at 5 AM in the morning because they claimed that he was was engaged in the interstate sale of raw milk in violation of federal law.

#10 A few years ago a 10-year-old girl was arrested and charged with a felony for bringing a small steak knife to school.  It turns out that all she wanted to do was to cut up her lunch so that she could eat it.

#11 On June 18th, two Christians decided that they would peacefully pass out copies of the gospel of John on a public sidewalk outside a public Islamic festival in Dearborn, Michigan and within three minutes 8 policemen surrounded them and placed them under arrest.

#12 A U.S. District Court judge slapped a 5oo dollar fine on Massachusetts fisherman Robert J. Eldridge for untangling a giant whale from his nets and setting it free.  So what was his crime?  Well, according to the court, Eldridge was supposed to call state authorities and wait for them do it.

#13 Once upon a time, a food fight in the cafeteria may have gotten you a detention.  Now it may get you locked up.  About a year ago, 25 students between the ages of 11 and 15 at a school in Chicago were taken into custody by police for being involved in a huge food fight in the school cafeteria.

#14 A few years ago a 70 year old grandmother was actually put in handcuffs and hauled off to jail for having a brown lawn.

Why in the world would anyone approve of the police arresting ordinary Americans for such things?

Most of the people in jail or prison are NOT violent offenders either.  They are people who were convicted of a drug related offense.

Don’t you think that prisons were originally meant for people who were a danger to society, not for people who are a danger to themselves.  People with drug addictions need serious medical help, from a doctor, not thrown in a tiny room and confined and then have their futures ruined because of a criminal record.  This is why drug legalization is not just a common sense argument, it is a moral argument.  Its not about defending the abuse of drugs, it is about appropriately categorizing the right punishment or consequence for abusing drugs.  Drug abuse is a medical concern, a self inflicting abuse issue, not a society harming one.  Drug abuse is for doctors to treat, not for prison guards to beat inmates.

Listen to the host of New World Order Report interview Mason Tvert, the leader in marijuana reform laws activism:

click here to see the interview

http://www.newworldorderreport.com/News/tabid/266/ID/4616/Founder-of-SAFER-Marijuana-Activist-Group-That-Lobbies-in-Colorado-Joins-Jonathan-Elinoff-on-the-New-World-Order-Report-along-with-Dahlia-Wasfi-and-Dylan-Avery.aspx



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